Yarn Bombing

January 17, 2012 § 1 Comment

Greetings, readers! Hope all of our American friends have recovered from the long weekend.

We’ve talked about yarn bombing a lot here on the blog. I was pretty excited to recently run a search on “yarn bombing” and come across a new Wikipedia entry for it.

Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, Canada

They say: “Yarn bombingyarnbombingyarnstormingguerrilla knittingurban knitting or graffiti knitting is a type of graffiti or street art that employs colorful displays of knitted or crocheted cloth rather than paint or chalk.

Method and motivation

While yarn installations – called yarn bombs or yarnstorms – may last for years, they are considered non-permanent, and, unlike graffiti, can be easily removed if necessary. Nonetheless, the practice is still technically illegal, though it is not often prosecuted vigorously.

While other forms of graffiti may be expressive, decorative, territorial, socio-political commentary, advertising or vandalism, yarn bombing was initially almost exclusively about reclaiming and personalizing sterile or cold public places. It has since developed with groups graffiti knitting worldwide each with their own agendas.

History

Examples have been recorded as early as May 2004 in Den Helder, Netherlands. In the U.S., in 2005 Texas knitters used their leftover and unfinished knitting projects, but it has since spread worldwide. The start of this movement has been attributed to Magda Sayeg, 37, from Houston, who says she first got the idea in 2005 when she covered the door handle of her boutique with a custom made cozy.

The movement has been said to be “changing the face of craft” as stitchers are more and more frequently being viewed as fibre artists rather than amateurs or vandals.

Joann Matvichuk of Lethbridge, Alberta invented International Yarnbombing Day, which was first observed on June 11, 2011.”

While we are not encouraging you to go out and break the law, dear readers, it’s pretty great to see this movement becoming a worldwide trend. Every time I encounter a yarn bombing unexpectedly it brightens my day, makes me smile and makes me reach for my ever-present knitting.

If you find yourself in Melbourne, Australia, there’s a big event coming up.

In January they are embarking on their biggest project to date and will be creating a public installation and running workshops. They will be covering all 12 trees in City Square with yarn to promote summer in the city and also to bring more coverage of crafts in Victoria. The yarn bombing installation date is Saturday, January 21 and on Sunday, January 22. They will hold learn to crochet and knit workshops and they estimate that they will remove it one month later. They have close to $20,000 of sponsorship [mainly in yarn] for the project so it’s a big deal! Anyone wanting to help out must sign up to the Yarn Corner Facebook group. If you are not local to Melbourne you can still join in but will have to pay for postage or use your own yarn.

Bombs away!

 

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§ One Response to Yarn Bombing

  • bomber jo says:

    Love that you used pic on my first yarn bombing at the top of your article. And thrilled that someone would see our work as “fabric art” 🙂

    On Easter we did a second bombing at SFU. The bathing beauties received new Easter “hats” and the “egg” got a cozy.

    And interestingly some of the yarn we used was Be Sweet yarn that I purchased years ago and was saving for the perfect project.

    Serendipities 😀

    http://joantayler.blogspot.ca/2012/04/easter-yarn-bomb.html

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