Knitting in the Classroom

March 9, 2011 § Leave a comment

Greetings, readers! This interesting article ran in the UK in mid-February. Since I tend to get on a soapbox about how knitting should be taught and embraced in schools (and in some in the US it is, but those are usually Montessori or specialized schools) I was particularly interested in this. Knitting teaches good math skills, reading, concentration, hand/eye coordination, the sense of accomplishment and the beauty of learning how to follow through with something and get a great end result.

Knitting patterns bring order to the classroom in Kent

Teachers at a school in Kent have embraced knitting patterns as a learning resource across several subjects – and the traditional skill is said to have been having a revolutionary effect on children’s behaviour.


In maths lessons, pupils at Worth Primary create a design to knit, before calculating the number of stitches they will need. During history classes they learn how to make medieval cloth, the Daily Mail reported.

After the Second World War, knitting patterns were commonplace in schools, but with the National Curriculum’s introduction in 1988 it was phased out.

Lynne Moore, headmistress at the school, told the newspaper that a “return to traditional values” had seen pupils’ behaviour improve dramatically.

“And it really helps communication. Instead of playing on their phones or computers, the children knit and talk to each other. They have proper conversations,” she added.

Earlier this month, the Coventry Telegraph reported how two women were planning a charity event in March that they hope will see more than 1,000 local people gather to use knitting patterns in a Guinness World Record attempt.

Posted by Alice Rowe

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And another here

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Just call us the school knitwits: The homely skill that is making a return to the classroom

By Kate Loveys

It was once a skill taught to nearly every schoolchild.

Now one school is bringing knitting back to the classroom – and it has had a revolutionary effect.

Teachers say it has improved behaviour, helped pupils learn to write and encouraged them to have conversations rather than play with their phones.

A good yarn: Sisters Tabitha and Betsy Forsyth concentrating hard on their new skill. Teachers say knitting has improved behaviour, helped pupils learn to write and encouraged them to have conversations rather than play with their phonesA good yarn: Sisters Tabitha and Betsy Forsyth concentrating hard on their new skill. Teachers say knitting has improved behaviour, helped pupils learn to write and encouraged them to have conversations rather than play with their phones

They have been so impressed with the impact of a lunchtime knitting club that they have started incorporating it into maths and history lessons.

During maths lessons, pupils at Worth Primary in Kent create a design to knit, then calculate the number of stitches they will need.

In history, knitting is used to help with their study of castles. They learn about clothing worn in the Middle Ages and how to make it.

After the Second World War, knitting was commonplace in schools.

But with the introduction of the National Curriculum in 1988 it was phased out.

Pins at the ready: A knitting class in the 1950s. It was once a skill taught to nearly every schoolchildPins at the ready: A knitting class in the 1950s. It was once a skill taught to nearly every schoolchild

Headmistress Lynne Moore said: ‘We think of it as a return to traditional values. It has dramatically improved behaviour.

‘And it really helps communication. Instead of playing on their phones or computers, the children knit and talk to each other. They have proper conversations.

Mrs Moore, 35, said an unintended consequence was that pupils’ writing skills improved. She said several started school unable to do up a button or hold a pen – but knitting improves their fine motor skills.

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Grab your needles and some yarn and encourage any student in your life (and after all, aren’t we all students in life?) to learn to knit!

 

 

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